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Posts Tagged ‘UNESCO World Heritage Sites’


Zimbabwe Visa Requirements to See the Rock Art of Matobo Hills

February 21st, 2011
If you visit this week's featured UNESCO World Heritage Site, you'll see some of the most incredible rock art in all of Africa. The Matobo Hills of Zimbabwe have been inhabited for many thousands of years, since well before the dawn of agriculture. The area's distinctive boulders and caves form natural shelters that humans have long taken advantage of. The name Matobo means "Bald Heads" in the language of the Ndebele people. According to the World Heritage website, "The Matobo Hills has one of the highest concentrations of rock art in Southern Africa. The rich evidence from archaeology and from the rock paintings at Matobo provide a very full picture of the lives of foraging societies in the Stone Age and the way agricultural societies came to replace them." There are several camps fo

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Get a Kenyan Visa to Visit Lake Turkana

February 12th, 2011
This week's featured UNESCO World Heritage Site is the largest permanent desert lake in the world. Lake Turkana is located in Kenya along the border with Ethiopia. Sometimes called the Jade Sea, this salt lake surrounds an active volcano on Central Island. Lake Turkana is a salt lake, but it's not nearly as salty as the Dead Sea, and animals like fish, crocodiles and birds thrive there. In addition to the crocs, large numbers of scorpions and poisonous snakes make it a dangerous place for tourists to travel unguided. That's not to say that you shouldn't go, only that you this park is best visited as part of an organized tour with a reputable tour group. The Lake Turkana World Heritage Site consists of 3 protected national parks: Sibiloi National Park, Central Island National Park and S

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Tanzania Visa Requirements to Visit the Serengeti National Park

February 6th, 2011
You've probably seen this week's featured UNESCO World Heritage Site in numerous nature shows. The Serengeti National Park is one of the most famous national parks not only in Tanzania, but in all of Africa. You know all of those "Trials of Life" type specials that show wildebeests, antelopes and zebras as they migrate in search of water? Yup, that happens here. The "Great Migration" happens twice a year, in October and then again in April. More than 2 million animals participate, and herds of wildebeests, eland, gazelles and zebra literally fill the horizon. Naturally, lions and other predators fallow the herds, looking for stragglers. It's an amazing, unforgettable event. Of course, even if you aren't there for the Great Migration, there's still plenty of wildlife to see in the Ser

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Get a Tajikistan Visa to Visit the Ancient Ruins of Sarazm

January 30th, 2011
Tajikistan is one of those countries that's often overlooked by American travelers, and with some good reasons. It's a relatively undeveloped country, and tourist facilities are often non-existent. Still, if you don't mind roughing it, a trip to Tajikistan can be an amazing experience. The scenery - golden steppes, towering mountains and isolated lakes - is simply breathtaking. Visiting this week's featured UNESCO World Heritage Site gives you a chance to take in the scenery and get a close look at the ruins of one of the country's oldest settlements. The city of Sarazm dates back to the 4th millennium BC, which makes it older than the Egyptian pyramids. It was abandoned in 2000 BC, but came to life again as a mining town about 500 years later. Many of the tools and structures une

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Get a Gambian Visa to Visit the Senegambian Stone Circles

January 21st, 2011
This week's featured UNESCO World Heritage site is located in the Gambia. The Stone Circles of Senegambia are located in four different groups along the River Gambia. Scientists believe they were built over more than a millennium, from 3 BC to the 16th century AD. The origins of these circles remain somewhat mysterious. Archaeologists believe that they were used to mark burial sites, and were possibly built on top of older graves. Other than that, nobody is sure what specific beliefs motivated the people who lived there to build so many stone circles. There is no doubt that the monuments are impressive, however, and just as with Stonehenge, half the fun of visiting them is speculating about who built them and why. According to the UNESCO site, "the survival of so many circles is a un

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